Since our beginning in 1929, UTRC has teamed with UTC’s business units, academic institutions and other global organizations to push the boundaries of science and technology.
1929

United Aircraft & Transportation Corporation’s Research Division—the precursor to United Technologies Research Center—was founded in 1929 at the behest of the company’s first president, Frederick Rentschler, and vice president, George Mead.

1929

The Research Division’s key contributions to the Wasp engine’s development included reducing drag and engine noise.

1937

Technology from the Research Division was applied to development of Pratt & Whitney Hornet engines, which powered the Sikorsky S-42 as it began Pan Am China Clipper’s commercial service in 1937.

1940

The Research Division conducted its first gas turbine experiment in 1940 on Pratt & Whitney’s PT-1.

1943

In 1943, the Research Division moved to its own facility, where work on a wind tunnel was under way.

1944

Wind tunnel testing began in 1944, and became integral in supporting the war effort.

1945

Renamed the Research Department in 1945, the unit’s campus continued to grow, including the completion of the world’s largest, privately owned wind tunnel.

1946

In 1946, the Research Department initiated work on missile and rocket studies, including the ramjet program.
Two inventions developed by the Research Department during this time were a form of vortex generator in 1947, and a fluid injection thrust vector control in 1949.
The facility’s machine computation laboratory was established in 1948.

1950

Over the course of the 1950s, the Research Department’s experiments with high-energy plasma led to new concepts in propulsion and power.

1955

In the wind tunnel facilities, simulations with wind velocities up to 10 times the speed of sound helped to advance aviation and astronautic technology.

1959

Exploration into hydrogen fuel cells in 1959 set the stage for alternative forms of power in spacecraft, submarines, buses and cars.

1959

The end of the decade also saw a third renaming of the unit to the United Aircraft Research Laboratories.

1960

Researchers experimented with levitation melting in 1960, examining the process’s ability to allow metal – in this case molten aluminum – to melt without contamination.

1960

The Research Laboratories’ first laser was demonstrated in 1960, and was followed by the development of a ruby laser shortly thereafter.
Laser picosecond pulses were first generated at the Research Laboratories In 1965, which allowed researchers to investigate the fundamental processes in atoms and molecules.

1962

The Digital Laboratory is one of the largest privately-owned mathematical computation laboratories in the country in 1962.

1965

In 1965, the unit helped the neighboring City of Hartford by conducting studies to evaluate the wind’s effect on the city’s high-rise buildings.

1967

The U.S. Air Force awarded the largest single order of boron filament ever placed to the Research Laboratories in 1967.

1968

The unit introduced a new manufacturing process in 1968 to produce high-modulus, high-strength boron fibers for reinforcing polymer and metal matrices.

1969

In 1969, the Research Laboratories not only created the theory for operating a hydrazine monopropulsion system to steer a spacecraft, but also developed the world’s largest, closed-cycle continuous wave electric-discharge CO laser.

1970

In 1970, the Research Laboratories began exploring non-aviation applications of gas turbine engines, including those for automobiles and electric power generation.

1971

The unit began construction of the first high-speed wind tunnel designed specifically for aerodynamic noise research in 1971, while also establishing a premier combustion sciences laboratory.

1972

Two important demonstrations of Research Laboratories’ technology took place in 1972. One demonstration featured a safe, compact chemical laser with a pumping and toxic gas treatment system for ground-based applications. The other was the first successful flight demonstration of a supersonic, hydrocarbon-fueled, integral-rocket ramjet missile propulsion system.

1974

In 1974, researchers invented COMPGLAS, a family of fiber-reinforced composites that made it possible for jet engine components to withstand extreme temperatures.
The first successful flight of an integral-rocket ramjet propulsion system developed by the Research Laboratories occurred in 1975.
To reflect the renaming of its parent company, the Research Laboratories became the United Technologies Research Center in 1975.

1976

The Research Center established the Industrial Laser Department in 1976, and soon after delivered multi-kilowatt CO2 lasers to Western Electric for the technology’s first practical application.
The unit’s work in lasers continued, as researchers developed an infrared laser inspection system for Essex in 1977 and constructed a modular CO2 laser in 1978.

1979

In 1979, the Research Center developed an 8-kilowatt wind turbine as part of a U.S. Department of Energy initiative to advance alternative sources of power. The unit also demonstrated a solar-powered, residential heating and cooling system.

1979

The Research Center marked 50 years of innovation in 1979, and established the new Optics and Applied Technology Laboratory.

1981

In 1981, the Research Center delivered a gait laboratory to the Connecticut Children’s Medical Center for analyzing human motion and diagnosing gait disorders.
In 1987, a method was invented for photo-inducing a grating sensor in the care of an optical fiber to measure temperature, pressure, strain, vibration, and chemical qualities.
In 1982, the Research Center’s multi-kilowatt CO2 lasers were delivered to General Motors for their first use in the automotive industry.
Pratt & Whitney used the Research Center’s CO2 laser extensively in 1982 for combustor production and in 1983 for turbine blade production.

1985

In 1985, the Research Center’s continued work on advanced materials produced crystal layers of gallium arsenide only one atom thick for use in aerospace, communications and computing.
Several other research and technology developments occurred in 1985, including a technique to join several chemical lasers together to act as one and the creation of lithniohate integrated optic modulators for fiber-optic gyro applications.

1987

Also in 1987, a second gait lab was built by the Research Center for the Gillette Children’s Hospital in Minnesota.

1988

In 1988, the Research Center invented Heterojunction Acoustic Charges Transfer (HACT) technology.

1989

The Research Center’s discovery of the axial-vorticity mixer-ejector concept in 1989 provided the basis for Pratt & Whitney’s jet noise suppressor exhaust nozzle.

1989

The Research Center marked 60 years by burying a time capsule in 1989, to be opened on the company’s 100th anniversary.

1990

In the early 1990s, UTRC provided a wide range of services and technologies in the development of Pratt & Whitney’s F119 engine.
Also in 1990, the Research Center validated the noise reduction benefits of the mixer-ejector kit for the JT8D-powered Boeing 737.
The Research Center achieved an industry first in 1991, obtaining endothermic reactions in readily available jet fuels.

1990

The Research Center first offered thermal spray coating to aerospace and commercial customers in 1990.

1991

In 1991, UTRC produced a silicon captive pressure sensor with unprecedented performance for Hamilton Standard aircraft engine and flight controls.
The Research Center supported Carrier’s development of a more efficient, quieter air conditioning unit in 1990.
The Research Center applied aerospace technology to a Carrier challenge in 1991, which allowed the business unit’s centrifugal chillers to achieve the industry’s highest aerodynamic efficiency.
In 1991, the Research Center worked with Argonne National Laboratory to develop a superconductive magnetic bearing with the lowest frictional loss ever achieved.

1992

Offices were established in Tokyo, Japan, and Madrid, Spain, in 1992 to spearhead international research programs.
Work continued with Otis and, in 1992, fuzzy logic dispatching for the Elevonic 411 gearless system was introduced in Japan.
In 1993 the technology was made available to the Japanese market, providing instantaneous call assignments for repair. Later modifications to the fuzzy logic dispatcher in 1996 provided Otis with a point of market differentiation.

1994

The unit demonstrated a breakthrough concept in 1994 for simultaneous active controls of rotating stall and surge in gas turbine engines.
More than 10 years ahead of the established international deadline, Research Center technology enabled Carrier to eliminate the use of CFC refrigerant in its North American produced chillers by 1993, and globally by 1994.
The Research Center completed the first successful laboratory test of a flywheel energy storage system for automotive applications in 1994.

1994

In 1994, the Research Center helped Sikorsky by developing aerospace technology used in the creation of the CYPHER unmanned air vehicle.
The Research Center demonstrated the feasibility of a magnetically guided elevator in 1995.
The first successful flight demonstration of active noise control for helicopter rotor and transmission was conducted by the unit in 1995.

1995

By 1995, UTRC had begun researching indoor air purification, and was developing methods for removing volatile organic compounds from the air.

1997

In 1997, the Research Center opened a new office in Shanghai, which allowed the unit to launch cooperative research projects across China.
The center also opened an office during this decade in Aachen, Germany.
Together with Otis, the Research Center developed the industry’s first continuous learning algorithm for tuning dispatcher parameters, which was first applied to Otis’ new Skyway system.

1998

In 1998, Sikorsky incorporated a vapor cycle air-conditioning system developed by the Research Center and Hamilton Standard into its S-92. The system featured a unique scroll compressor design. Sponsored by the National Institute of Standards & Technology, the Research Center demonstrated innovative high-speed, compact centrifugal compressor technology for HVAC applications.

1998

The Research Center continued researching “green’ technologies through the latter part of the 1990s in an effort to make UTC’s manufacturing processes more environmentally sound.

1999

In 1999, Research Center scientists and International Fuel Cell engineers were close to an equipment design for extracting hydrogen from gasoline. This step was necessary for fuel cells to become practical, given the transportation infrastructure worldwide.

2000

In 2000, the Research Center and UTC cooperatively developed a hydrogen-powered fuel cell sport utility vehicle for Hyundai.

2001

The first concurrent engineering laboratory was opened by the Research Center in 2001, and focused on integrated total aircraft power systems.
A Research Center tool called MASC was first applied in product development in 2001. It used virtual, physics-based models to increase product quality and decrease development time and cost.
In 2001, the unit developed an electro-chemical control process called E-strip to reduce the cost of repairing turbine blades and vanes.

2003

The Research Center opened a new laboratory in 2003 to support the development of integrated cooling, heating, and power systems.

2003

Research began in 2003 on intelligent security and fire detection systems, which was part of the Research Center’s explorations into integrated technologies for a new generation of high-performance, energy-efficient buildings.
Otis was able to launch its revolutionary NextStep escalator in 2003, thanks in large part to the Research Center’s structural and dynamical analysis of the system.

2006

In 2006, the unit developed a geothermal power plant capable of enabling power generation from low-temperature, 165°F water. The technology was recognized with an R&D 100 award in 2007.
In 2007, the Research Center demonstrated power generation for a high-Mach scramjet propulsion system that employs thermoelectric devices.

2007

Through a collaborative effort, The Tsinghua University – UTC Research Institute for Integrated Building Energy, Safety and Control Systems was established in Beijing, China, in 2007.
Working with Carrier, the Research Center developed microchannel condensers for commercial chillers, containers and roof-top units.

2008

To support Pratt & Whitney’s development of its Geared Turbofan™ engines in 2008, the Research Center enhanced and applied SyLNT acoustic analysis modeling tools to the technology.

2008

In 2008, the Research Center opened two new laboratories – one dedicated to synthetic fuels and the other to power electronic research.
The Research Center achieved the world’s first flight of a fuel cell powered rotorcraft in 2008.

2010

In 2010, the Research Center helped to establish the Energy Innovation Hub in Philadelphia, through funding provided by the U.S. Department of Energy.

2012

The Research Center completed a yearlong study in 2012 that demonstrated the cost-effective, high efficiency and environmentally responsible characteristics of a new digitally controlled combustion control module for military boiler plants, with the prototype system operating in the U.S. Army's 200-year-old arsenal in Watervliet, N.Y.

2013

The Research Center earned a second R&D 100 award in 2013 for its breakthrough flow battery energy storage system.

1929

United Aircraft & Transportation Corporation’s Research Division—the precursor to United Technologies Research Center—was founded in 1929 at the behest of the company’s first president, Frederick Rentschler, and vice president, George Mead.

1929

The Research Division’s key contributions to the Wasp engine’s development included reducing drag and engine noise.

1937

Technology from the Research Division was applied to development of Pratt & Whitney Hornet engines, which powered the Sikorsky S-42 as it began Pan Am China Clipper’s commercial service in 1937.

1940

The Research Division conducted its first gas turbine experiment in 1940 on Pratt & Whitney’s PT-1.

1943

In 1943, the Research Division moved to its own facility, where work on a wind tunnel was under way.

1944

Wind tunnel testing began in 1944, and became integral in supporting the war effort.

1945

Renamed the Research Department in 1945, the unit’s campus continued to grow, including the completion of the world’s largest, privately owned wind tunnel.

1946

In 1946, the Research Department initiated work on missile and rocket studies, including the ramjet program.
Two inventions developed by the Research Department during this time were a form of vortex generator in 1947, and a fluid injection thrust vector control in 1949.
The facility’s machine computation laboratory was established in 1948.

1950

Over the course of the 1950s, the Research Department’s experiments with high-energy plasma led to new concepts in propulsion and power.

1955

In the wind tunnel facilities, simulations with wind velocities up to 10 times the speed of sound helped to advance aviation and astronautic technology.

1959

Exploration into hydrogen fuel cells in 1959 set the stage for alternative forms of power in spacecraft, submarines, buses and cars.

1959

The end of the decade also saw a third renaming of the unit to the United Aircraft Research Laboratories.

1960

Researchers experimented with levitation melting in 1960, examining the process’s ability to allow metal – in this case molten aluminum – to melt without contamination.

1960

The Research Laboratories’ first laser was demonstrated in 1960, and was followed by the development of a ruby laser shortly thereafter.
Laser picosecond pulses were first generated at the Research Laboratories In 1965, which allowed researchers to investigate the fundamental processes in atoms and molecules.

1962

The Digital Laboratory is one of the largest privately-owned mathematical computation laboratories in the country in 1962.

1965

In 1965, the unit helped the neighboring City of Hartford by conducting studies to evaluate the wind’s effect on the city’s high-rise buildings.

1967

The U.S. Air Force awarded the largest single order of boron filament ever placed to the Research Laboratories in 1967.

1968

The unit introduced a new manufacturing process in 1968 to produce high-modulus, high-strength boron fibers for reinforcing polymer and metal matrices.

1969

In 1969, the Research Laboratories not only created the theory for operating a hydrazine monopropulsion system to steer a spacecraft, but also developed the world’s largest, closed-cycle continuous wave electric-discharge CO laser.

1970

In 1970, the Research Laboratories began exploring non-aviation applications of gas turbine engines, including those for automobiles and electric power generation.

1971

The unit began construction of the first high-speed wind tunnel designed specifically for aerodynamic noise research in 1971, while also establishing a premier combustion sciences laboratory.

1972

Two important demonstrations of Research Laboratories’ technology took place in 1972. One demonstration featured a safe, compact chemical laser with a pumping and toxic gas treatment system for ground-based applications. The other was the first successful flight demonstration of a supersonic, hydrocarbon-fueled, integral-rocket ramjet missile propulsion system.

1974

In 1974, researchers invented COMPGLAS, a family of fiber-reinforced composites that made it possible for jet engine components to withstand extreme temperatures.
The first successful flight of an integral-rocket ramjet propulsion system developed by the Research Laboratories occurred in 1975.
To reflect the renaming of its parent company, the Research Laboratories became the United Technologies Research Center in 1975.

1976

The Research Center established the Industrial Laser Department in 1976, and soon after delivered multi-kilowatt CO2 lasers to Western Electric for the technology’s first practical application.
The unit’s work in lasers continued, as researchers developed an infrared laser inspection system for Essex in 1977 and constructed a modular CO2 laser in 1978.

1979

In 1979, the Research Center developed an 8-kilowatt wind turbine as part of a U.S. Department of Energy initiative to advance alternative sources of power. The unit also demonstrated a solar-powered, residential heating and cooling system.

1979

The Research Center marked 50 years of innovation in 1979, and established the new Optics and Applied Technology Laboratory.

1981

In 1981, the Research Center delivered a gait laboratory to the Connecticut Children’s Medical Center for analyzing human motion and diagnosing gait disorders.
In 1987, a method was invented for photo-inducing a grating sensor in the care of an optical fiber to measure temperature, pressure, strain, vibration, and chemical qualities.
In 1982, the Research Center’s multi-kilowatt CO2 lasers were delivered to General Motors for their first use in the automotive industry.
Pratt & Whitney used the Research Center’s CO2 laser extensively in 1982 for combustor production and in 1983 for turbine blade production.

1985

In 1985, the Research Center’s continued work on advanced materials produced crystal layers of gallium arsenide only one atom thick for use in aerospace, communications and computing.
Several other research and technology developments occurred in 1985, including a technique to join several chemical lasers together to act as one and the creation of lithniohate integrated optic modulators for fiber-optic gyro applications.

1987

Also in 1987, a second gait lab was built by the Research Center for the Gillette Children’s Hospital in Minnesota.

1988

In 1988, the Research Center invented Heterojunction Acoustic Charges Transfer (HACT) technology.

1989

The Research Center’s discovery of the axial-vorticity mixer-ejector concept in 1989 provided the basis for Pratt & Whitney’s jet noise suppressor exhaust nozzle.

1989

The Research Center marked 60 years by burying a time capsule in 1989, to be opened on the company’s 100th anniversary.

1990

In the early 1990s, UTRC provided a wide range of services and technologies in the development of Pratt & Whitney’s F119 engine.
Also in 1990, the Research Center validated the noise reduction benefits of the mixer-ejector kit for the JT8D-powered Boeing 737.
The Research Center achieved an industry first in 1991, obtaining endothermic reactions in readily available jet fuels.

1990

The Research Center first offered thermal spray coating to aerospace and commercial customers in 1990.

1991

In 1991, UTRC produced a silicon captive pressure sensor with unprecedented performance for Hamilton Standard aircraft engine and flight controls.
The Research Center supported Carrier’s development of a more efficient, quieter air conditioning unit in 1990.
The Research Center applied aerospace technology to a Carrier challenge in 1991, which allowed the business unit’s centrifugal chillers to achieve the industry’s highest aerodynamic efficiency.
In 1991, the Research Center worked with Argonne National Laboratory to develop a superconductive magnetic bearing with the lowest frictional loss ever achieved.

1992

Offices were established in Tokyo, Japan, and Madrid, Spain, in 1992 to spearhead international research programs.
Work continued with Otis and, in 1992, fuzzy logic dispatching for the Elevonic 411 gearless system was introduced in Japan.
In 1993 the technology was made available to the Japanese market, providing instantaneous call assignments for repair. Later modifications to the fuzzy logic dispatcher in 1996 provided Otis with a point of market differentiation.

1994

The unit demonstrated a breakthrough concept in 1994 for simultaneous active controls of rotating stall and surge in gas turbine engines.
More than 10 years ahead of the established international deadline, Research Center technology enabled Carrier to eliminate the use of CFC refrigerant in its North American produced chillers by 1993, and globally by 1994.
The Research Center completed the first successful laboratory test of a flywheel energy storage system for automotive applications in 1994.

1994

In 1994, the Research Center helped Sikorsky by developing aerospace technology used in the creation of the CYPHER unmanned air vehicle.
The Research Center demonstrated the feasibility of a magnetically guided elevator in 1995.
The first successful flight demonstration of active noise control for helicopter rotor and transmission was conducted by the unit in 1995.

1995

By 1995, UTRC had begun researching indoor air purification, and was developing methods for removing volatile organic compounds from the air.

1997

In 1997, the Research Center opened a new office in Shanghai, which allowed the unit to launch cooperative research projects across China.
The center also opened an office during this decade in Aachen, Germany.
Together with Otis, the Research Center developed the industry’s first continuous learning algorithm for tuning dispatcher parameters, which was first applied to Otis’ new Skyway system.

1998

In 1998, Sikorsky incorporated a vapor cycle air-conditioning system developed by the Research Center and Hamilton Standard into its S-92. The system featured a unique scroll compressor design. Sponsored by the National Institute of Standards & Technology, the Research Center demonstrated innovative high-speed, compact centrifugal compressor technology for HVAC applications.

1998

The Research Center continued researching “green’ technologies through the latter part of the 1990s in an effort to make UTC’s manufacturing processes more environmentally sound.

1999

In 1999, Research Center scientists and International Fuel Cell engineers were close to an equipment design for extracting hydrogen from gasoline. This step was necessary for fuel cells to become practical, given the transportation infrastructure worldwide.

2000

In 2000, the Research Center and UTC cooperatively developed a hydrogen-powered fuel cell sport utility vehicle for Hyundai.

2001

The first concurrent engineering laboratory was opened by the Research Center in 2001, and focused on integrated total aircraft power systems.
A Research Center tool called MASC was first applied in product development in 2001. It used virtual, physics-based models to increase product quality and decrease development time and cost.
In 2001, the unit developed an electro-chemical control process called E-strip to reduce the cost of repairing turbine blades and vanes.

2003

The Research Center opened a new laboratory in 2003 to support the development of integrated cooling, heating, and power systems.

2003

Research began in 2003 on intelligent security and fire detection systems, which was part of the Research Center’s explorations into integrated technologies for a new generation of high-performance, energy-efficient buildings.
Otis was able to launch its revolutionary NextStep escalator in 2003, thanks in large part to the Research Center’s structural and dynamical analysis of the system.

2006

In 2006, the unit developed a geothermal power plant capable of enabling power generation from low-temperature, 165°F water. The technology was recognized with an R&D 100 award in 2007.
In 2007, the Research Center demonstrated power generation for a high-Mach scramjet propulsion system that employs thermoelectric devices.

2007

Through a collaborative effort, The Tsinghua University – UTC Research Institute for Integrated Building Energy, Safety and Control Systems was established in Beijing, China, in 2007.
Working with Carrier, the Research Center developed microchannel condensers for commercial chillers, containers and roof-top units.

2008

To support Pratt & Whitney’s development of its Geared Turbofan™ engines in 2008, the Research Center enhanced and applied SyLNT acoustic analysis modeling tools to the technology.

2008

In 2008, the Research Center opened two new laboratories – one dedicated to synthetic fuels and the other to power electronic research.
The Research Center achieved the world’s first flight of a fuel cell powered rotorcraft in 2008.

2010

In 2010, the Research Center helped to establish the Energy Innovation Hub in Philadelphia, through funding provided by the U.S. Department of Energy.

2012

The Research Center completed a yearlong study in 2012 that demonstrated the cost-effective, high efficiency and environmentally responsible characteristics of a new digitally controlled combustion control module for military boiler plants, with the prototype system operating in the U.S. Army's 200-year-old arsenal in Watervliet, N.Y.

2013

The Research Center earned a second R&D 100 award in 2013 for its breakthrough flow battery energy storage system.

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