May 17, 2016

UTRC contributes to game-changing report for a systems approach to energy efficiency

EAST HARTFORD, Connecticut – Leaders from United Technologies Research Center, UTC Climate, Controls & Security (CCS), and UTC Government Relations joined the Alliance to Save Energy (ASE) and other industry partners to release a report detailing the cost and energy savings available through a systems approach -- rather than a device-level approach -- to buildings efficiency.

There is growing consensus within the buildings industry that focusing on building systems -- a combination of equipment, controls, operations and interconnections -- will become increasingly necessary to achieve future meaningful and cost-effective energy savings in buildings.

ASE released the Systems Efficiency Initiative (SEI) Year 1 Report at the 2016 EE Global Forum in Washington, D.C. The report, titled, "Greater than the Sum of its Parts: The Case for a Systems Approach to Energy Efficiency," describes a major shift in traditional thinking about buildings efficiency that has been heralded as a game changer by industry partners.

Craig Walker, UTC Executive Champion for the SEI initiative; and Dick Lord, a Senior Fellow at CCS, helped ASE determine the scope and focus of work for this study, and were instrumental in identifying current state and gaps/barriers with systems solutions. Dick Lord was the primary author of the mechanical equipment section.

The UTC team will continue to engage the SEI during phase 2 of the project, when they identify more specific gaps in systems-level building efficiency, and work with respective government agencies, non-government organizations, and peer companies, to help close those gaps.

Lord said, "ASE's efforts also align with work underway at Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI), where they are conducting similar work to look at systems approaches, and will develop tools and methods for the industry and regulations to implement the systems approach."

Sum of its Parts explores the significant untapped energy savings available through a systems-efficiency approach to building design, construction and operation. The report considers interactions within various building systems, with a focus on mechanical and lighting systems. It also explores interactions among multiple systems within a building, and discusses challenges and opportunities for implementing a systems-level approach to building efficiency.

Contacts: Laura Stevens, UTRC, (860) 610-1653